Call for papers: Multi-session workshop “Women in Bondage: Local and Transnational Histories”

128th American Historical Association Meeting

Washington DC
January 2 – 5, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

Multi-session Workshop
Women in Bondage: Local and Transnational Histories

Despite the growing number of scholarly works focusing on gender and slavery in the Caribbean and the United States, the history of enslaved women remains unexplored in various periods and geographical areas, including Brazil and parts of Latin America. This workshop aims to fill out this gap by proposing not only to examine the history of enslaved women in the Americas during the period of the Atlantic slave trade, but also in other periods of time and regions of the globe, including Africa, Asia, and the Muslim world. This comparative approach aims to explore the similarities and differences among the various kinds of individual and collective experiences lived by women in bondage in the past and the present. Paper proposals examining primary sources and exploring forms of enslavement, cultural resistance, rebellion, paths to freedom, sexuality, motherhood, health, marriage, and religious practices are particularly welcome.

Convened by

Ana Lucia Araujo
Associate Professor
Department of History
Howard University
Washington, DC

 

Please send your paper proposal no later than February 1st 2012 to:

aaraujo@howard.edu or analucia.araujo@gmail.com

 

Paper proposals must include:

– Paper’s title
– Abstract (maximum 300 words)
– Biographical paragraph (up to 250 words, no curriculum vitae, please)
– Correct mailing and e-mail address
– Audiovisual needs, if any

Chairs and commentators, please send:

– Biographical paragraph (up to 250 words, no curriculum vitae, please)
– Correct mailing and e-mail addresses
Important information:

– All participants are responsible for their travel expenses (registration, hotel, airfare).
– Abstracts of proposals accepted by the AHA committee will be posted on the AHA program website.
– Papers must be submitted on December 1st 2013

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade

AHA Session 33

Thursday, January 5, 2012: 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

Purdue Room (Chicago Marriott Downtown)

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Part 1: Memory, Identity, and Religion: Afro-Atlantic Encounters during the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade and Beyond

 

Chair: Rosanne M. Adderley, Tulane University

 

Papers:

The Exodus of 1835: Life Histories, Social Networks, and the Return to Africa

Lisa Castillo, Universidade Federal da Bahia

 

West Central African Religious Specialists in Angola and Minas Gerais in the Eighteenth Century

Kalle Kananoja, Åbo Akademi University

 

Homeward Bound: History, Imagination, and Memory in Afro-Atlantic Discourse

Tyler Perry, University of South Carolina

 

Obayifo to Obeah: Priestly Power and Other Elements of Afro-Atlantic Akan Identity

Robert Hanserd, Northern Illinois University

 

Comment: Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University

* * *

Friday, January 6, 2012: 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Addison Room (Chicago Marriott Downtown)

AHA Session 65

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Part 2: Enslaved Rebels and Maroons: Comparing Slave Resistance in the Nineteenth-Century Americas

 

Chair: Joshua M. Rosenthal, Western Connecticut State University

 

Papers:

Honor, Manhood, and the Mississippi Slave Insurrection Scare of 1835

Lydia J. Plath, University of Glasgow

 

Rebel Slaves, Maroons, and Deserters: Slave Resistance in the Border of Brazil and Río de la Plata in the Nineteenth Century

Gabriel Aladrén, Universidade Federal Fluminense

 

A Forgotten Heritage: “Slave Societies” in the French Caribbean Colonies during the First Half of the Nineteenth Century

Nelly Schmidt, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and and Université Paris IV-Sorbonne

 

“The Celebrated Bandit Joe”: Uncovering Forest Joe’s Lowcountry Maroon Campaign of 1821–23

J. Brent Morris, University of South Carolina Aiken

 

Comment: Rosanne M. Adderley, Tulane University

 

* * *

AHA Session 99

Friday, January 6, 2012: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM

Addison Room (Chicago Marriott Downtown)

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Part 3: Slave Rebellions and the Building of African Identities in the Caribbean

 

Chair: Karen Cook-Bell, Johns Hopkins University and Bowie State Univeristy

 

Papers:

Retaining, Reconstructing, and Recreating African Ethnic Identities in Cuba: The Relocation of Havana’s Cabildos de Nación

Matt D. Childs, University of South Carolina

 

Lucumí-Inspired Revolts in Rural Colonial Cuba: The Case of the Banes Uprising, 1833

Henry Lovejoy, University of California, Los Angeles

 

Reassessing “Tacky’s Revolt”: Slaves’ Uses of Violence in Jamaica during the Seven Years’ War

Maria Alessandra Bollettino, Framingham State University

 

Re-centering the Periphery: Jamaica’s First Maroon War and the British Atlantic World, 1728–42

Brian C. Bredehoeft, University of Florida

 

Comment: Karen Y. Morrison, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 

* * *

AHA Session 133

Saturday, January 7, 2012: 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Iowa Room (Chicago Marriott Downtown)

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Part 4: West African Historical Actors during the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade

 

Chair: Matt D. Childs, University of South Carolina

 

Papers:

Dahomean Rulers and the Luso-Brazilian Slave Trade

Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University

 

From Signares to Citizens in Early Colonial Senegal

Lorelle D. Semley, College of the Holy Cross

 

Comment:

Sandra E. Greene, Cornell University

 

* * *

 

AHA Session 163

Saturday, January 7, 2012: 11:30 AM-1:30 PM

Belmont Room (Chicago Marriott Downtown)

Moving Communities and Networks in the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Part 5: Family Networks: Enslaved and Slave Traders in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic

 

Chair: Sean Kelley, Hartwick College

 

Papers:

Transatlantic Family Enterprises: Slave Trade Networks in the Caribbean World, 1745–1808

Nadine Hunt, York University

 

“The Purposes Both of Interest and Humanity”: The British and African Slave Trading Community and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World

Randy J. Sparks, Tulane University

 

Africans in Colonial Mississippi: Mastering the Atlantic World in Spanish Natchez

Christian Pinnen, University of Southern Mississippi

 

Comment: Susan D. Amussen, University of California, Merced

CFP – Representing the Irrepresentable: Narratives and Visual Images of Slavery, Forced Labor, and Genocide

CALL FOR PAPERS

Multi-Session Workshop

Representing the Irrepresentable: Narratives and Visual Images of Slavery, Forced Labor, and Genocide

127th American Historical Association Meeting; New Orleans, January 3 – 6, 2013

Convened by Ana Lucia Araujo (Department of History; Howard University, Washington, DC)

This workshop will gather scholars working on written narratives (documents, autobiographies, personal journals, novels, etc.) and visual images (painting, drawings, photographs, engravings, movies, etc.) dealing with forced displacement, enslavement, slavery, forced labor, war, and genocide. The various participants will engage in understanding how the multiple dimensions of traumatic human experiences can be conveyed through images and narratives. How historians can examine written and visible representations of irrepresentable events? Can narratives and images provide reliable and/or accurate information for historians to interpret traumatic dimensions of past and present human experience? How historians articulate the use of eyewitness accounts (visual and written) with fiction (novel, films) in order to represent past traumatic experiences? What are the limits, the challenges, and the possibilities faced by historians who employ narratives and images of trauma in their works? By focusing on various historical periods and geographical areas, scholars are invited to submit proposals addressing these questions and examining specific case studies. Papers focusing on the Atlantic slave trade and slavery, colonialism in Africa, the Holocaust, Nazi labor camps, the Armenian genocide, the Apartheid, the Rwandan genocide, the war in Darfur, contemporary slavery, and human trafficking, are welcome.

Please send your paper proposal no later than February 1st 2012 to:

aaraujo@howard.edu or analucia.araujo@gmail.com

Paper proposals must contain:

– Paper’s title

– Abstract (up to 300 words)

– Biographical paragraph (up to 250 words, no curriculum vitae, please)

– Correct mailing and e-mail address

– Audiovisual needs, if any

 Chairs and commentators, please send:

– Biographical paragraph (up to 250 words, no curriculum vitae, please)

– Correct mailing and e-mail addresses

Please note:

– Abstracts of accepted proposals will be posted on the AHA program website.

– Papers must be submitted on December 1st 2012 for the panel commentators.

New book Crossing Memories: Slavery and African Diaspora

My book  Crossing Memories: Slavery and Africa Diaspora,  co-edited with Mariana P. Candido and Paul E. Lovejoy is now on sale. Most of the chapters in this book resulted from the papers presented during the international conference “Crossing Memories: Slavery and African Diaspora,” which I organized in Quebec City in 2005.

The book examines the history and the memory of slavery in Africa and the Americas from the period of the transatlantic slave trade until the present day. Using diverse approaches and a myriad of sources such as archival documents, biographies, oral accounts, internet forums, monuments, engravings, and watercolors, the contributors investigate how slavery has shaped the past and the present lives of the African diaspora populations. The contributors to this volume are scholars based in the Americas and Europe.